Theft Information

IF YOU’VE BEEN CHARGED WITH THEFT, YOU NEED AN EXPERIENCED
ATTORNEY TO REVIEW YOUR CASE. IT IS A CAUSE FOR CONCERN, BUT OUR
EXPERIENCED ATTORNEYS CAN HELP. WE OFFER FREE CONSULTATIONS
Theft is the wrongful taking, obtaining, or withholding property of another with the intent to deprive the owner of such
property. There are different types of theft in Idaho, and depending on which type of theft you are charged with your
penalty can vary.

TYPES OF THEFT AND PENALTIES
GRAND THEFT
Grand Theft is a felony. It is generally punishable by up to 14 years in prison and up to a $5,000 fine. Grand Theft is a
theft where: The value of the property taken exceeds $1,000. If multiple items are taken, their values can be added
together to reach the one thousand dollar threshold. But, checks, financial transaction cards (debit or credit cards), and
firearms are common examples of items that will be grand theft, regardless of the value.

PETIT THEFT
Petit Theft is any theft that is not a Grand Theft (less than $1,000, not taken forcefully, not a firearm, check, or credit
card). Petit Theft is a misdemeanor and is punishable by up to one year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.

WILLFUL CONCEALMENT
Willful Concealment is closely related to theft, but is actually a different crime. It is often referred to simply as ‘shoplifting.
Willful Concealment is punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.

BURGLARY
Burglary is defined as entering a place with the intent to commit theft or a felony. So, a shoplifting or petit theft case turns
into a burglary if there is evidence that the person intended to commit the theft when they entered the store. Most of the
time, the evidence needed to prove a burglary is gained by the person’s own admission about their intent. Burglary is a
felony and is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and up to a $50,000 fine.

CHALLENGING YOUR THEFT CHARGE
By hiring a quality defense lawyer who can protect your rights, there are a host of ways your case may be defendable. It
must always be remembered that the State must prove each and every element of the charge beyond a reasonable
doubt. If the state fails to prove just one of the elements beyond a reasonable doubt, then the Jury has no choice but to
find you not guilty of the charge. You have a right to a jury trial. You have a right to confront your accusers. You have a
call your own witnesses, and even subpoena reluctant witnesses to appear in court. You will not be required to testify
yourself. You have a right to remain silent throughout the entire proceeding. The jury will be instructed by the judge that
they are not to speculate or form any conclusions as to why you may have chosen not to take the stand. Of course you
also have a right to speak if you wish, and tell the jury your side of the story.

FREE CONSULTATION
•Ask us how to challenge the accusations against you
•Ask us how to minimize the penalties that you are facing
•Call 208-466-1800 for your free consultation today
•Available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week for emergencies

 

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